Timber Frame Gazebo, Design, Plans & Build – Part 2

Brace Options

As another option, I have included another brace variation in the plans that allows for a flush mount onto the inside of the girt or front roof beam.

Another brace variation for front roof beam and front post
Optional brace for front roof beam and front post

This matches the look of the other braces from the outside.

Front Roof Beams

The front roof beams are made from two by eight stock.

Front roof beams - Pavilion Construction
Front roof beams

A similar ellipse profile is cut in the ends as the upper beams.

Quarter ellipse profile cut with jigsaw
Quarter ellipse profile cut with jigsaw

And the beam that mounts on the front post has a small groove cut to make clearance for the girt. These are also chamfered with the power plane and angle grinder.

Dressing 2x8 beams with plane - Timber Frame Gazebo
Front roof beams chamfered before installing

First I attach the beam to the front posts with construction adhesive and lag bolts.

Roof beam is attached to front posts with glue and bolts
Roof beam is attached to front posts with glue and bolts

To help attach the lower front beam I screwed on some temporary boards to the bottom edge of the girts. This allows me to rest this beam on these supports while I drill and run in lag bolts.

Lower front roof beam is set on supports
Lower front roof beam is set on supports then drilled and screwed in place

In addition to these lag bolts I add a galvanized corner brace to the inside of the lower front roof beam where it meets the girt.

Metal supports - Timber Frame Gazebo
Additional bracing supports lower front roof beam where it connects to the end of the girts

Main Roof Rafters

The twelve best fir two by eights for the rafters are pulled from the pile. These are inspected, marked for their crown then cut to length.

main roof rafters getting stained - Timber Frame Gazebo
Staining main roof rafters

The ellipse profile is copied onto the ends and cut with the jigsaw. They are stained and let dry overnight.
I also rolled on a coat of stain on the pavilion frame the same day. It’s easier to do now than after the rafters go up.

Timber Frame Gazebo - Twelve 2x8 full dimension fir roof rafters make up the main roof
Twelve 2×8 full dimension fir roof rafters make up the main roof
Detail of how the rafters sit on the rear beam - Timber Frame Gazebo
Detail of how the rafters sit on the rear beam

Each rafter is hauled up and positioned across the top beams.

Two birds-mouth cuts (plumb and seat)
Each rafter has two birds-mouth cuts

The birds-mouths are marked then it’s taken down to the sawhorses.

Timber Frame Gazebo - The rafters are marked by laying them over the beams. Then taken down to sawhorses to cut
The rafters are marked by laying them over the beams. Then taken down to sawhorses to cut

They are cut with a circular saw, then finished with the jigsaw.
To start I clamp some blocks to the ends of the top beams. On the rafter I pre-marked the point where it will contact the upper beam. At this mark I cut a small saw kerf to help hold it in place while I mark the birds-mouth.

Circular saw roughs out the seat and plumb cut first
Circular saw roughs out the seat and plumb cut first

I haul up the first rafter and clamp it to the block to hold it. I have some wooden home-made scaffolding and planks to stand on so I set those up.

Cuts are then finished with a jigsaw
Cuts are then finished with a jigsaw

I take the rafter down to the sawhorses and cut the birds-mouth. Then permanently attach the blocks to the beams.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shopping Cart
Scroll to Top