Building Projects

DIY Timber Frame Gazebo Part 3

By October 25, 2018 November 25th, 2018 No Comments

DIY Timber Frame Gazebo. Plans available for download in PDF Format.

Part 3 of 3

See the How to Video.

In this the last part of our Pavilion Construction, we’ll finish the roofing.

Part 3 – Roofing the Timber Frame Gazebo

Install Strapping

Strapping made from one by eights is then screwed to the top of the rafters.

Strapping supports the tin roof panels

Strapping supports the tin roof panels

I space them about 8 inches apart and add an extra board at the top and bottom of the slope to cover the overhangs.

The 1x8's are pre-stained and installed face down

The 1×8’s are pre-stained and installed face down

I laid the boards out on sawhorses and rolled on a coat of stain on what would be the underside and edges.

Extra strapping board at bottom and top to cover overhangs

Extra strapping board at bottom and top to cover overhangs

Even if you are used to being on roofs it can get get tricky sometimes. You always have to watch your foot placement walking on rafters and strapping.

Front Roof Rafters

The front roof rafters are 2×6 cedar.

2x6 rafters laid over beams to mark the vertical plumb cut and horizontal seat cut

2×6 rafters laid over beams to mark the vertical plumb cut and horizontal seat cut

I cut them to length, trace the ellipse profile on one end, then lay them across the front beams to mark the birds-mouth cuts.

A small block of wood is used to lay out the birds mouth cut

A small block of wood is used to lay out the birds mouth cut

I clamp the rafter to a pair of sawhorses to make the cuts with my jigsaw.

Rafters cut on sawhorses with jigsaw

Rafters cut on sawhorses with jigsaw

End profile quarter ellipse cut with jigsaw

End profile quarter ellipse cut with jigsaw

When they are done I chamfer the edges with power plane and angle grinder with a sanding disc.

Rafters dressed and chamfered with sanding disc on angle grinder

Rafters dressed and chamfered with sanding disc on angle grinder

A quick single coat of stain is applied with a small roller.

Roll on one-coat stain on rafters

Roll on one-coat stain on rafters

When dry, I take them back up to the beams and attach with screws.

When finished, rafters installed on beams with screws

When finished, rafters installed on beams with screws

Rafters installed and waiting for strapping and trim boards

Rafters installed and waiting for strapping and trim boards

Across these rafters I attach 1×6 strapping. I had a few extra so I spaced them a bit tighter.

Trimmed and strapped

1×6 boards installed to attach roof panels to

Trim is ripped down on the table saw and stained and screwed to the end rafters and across the front and back edge.

Install Roofing

Now to get the roofing on the front.

Tar paper rolled out and stapled to strapping

Tar paper rolled out and stapled to strapping

Tar paper is rolled out over the front roof strapping and stapled into place. It was a bit finicky around the front posts so it took a bit longer to get that cut and stapled in place.

First metal roof panel ripped to width with cutter attachment on drill

First metal roof panel ripped to width with cutter attachment on drill

The metal roof panels I ordered are 3 foot wide. So, I needed to figure how I was going to lay them out so the seams where in a good location. And, that cutting around the front posts was as easy as possible. And I didn’t want the last panel to be a thin strip that was not attached well. So that meant I needed to rip down the first panel before I cut the hole for the post.

I have a metal cutting attachment that fits onto a drill. This tool makes cutting these panels a breeze.

Panel laid on roof to mark and scribe the post location

Panel laid on roof to mark and scribe the post location

This first panel is laid in place and lined up with the edge of the roof. I use a sharpie to mark the post and brace edges on the panel.

Roof panel cut with tin snips

Roof panel cut with tin snips

Then back down to a sawhorse to cut out the shape. It was a bit too tight so I had to trim off a bit more and I could do that up on the roof.

Second panel overlapped the first at edge to align both to roof before screws

Second panel overlapped the first at edge to align both to roof before screws

Before I screwed this first panel down I set the second panel in place and overlap the first. I do this to check the alignment and to square the first two panels to my roof.

Last two panels intersect at far post so need to be cut to fit

Last two panels intersect at far post so need to be cut to fit

I measure and mark the screw locations so I’ll be consistent and evenly spaced across the entire front roof. And to be sure that all my screws hit wood underneath.
I use 1 inch screws with rubber washers for this.

The fourth panel ran into the far front post. So, like the first, I marked it’s location and cut out the shape with snips.

Last panels trimmed with cutter drill attachment

Last panels trimmed with cutter drill attachment

The last panel is ripped to length and a corner removed. The seam of the last two panels ran into the post. So they both needed cutting.

The last panel was ripped a bit long so I could bend up the side to channel water away from the edge. I do this with a hand-held folder, cut off the excess, and fine tune the bend with a hand seamer.

Edge of roof panel bent up to channel water away from edge

Edge of roof panel bent up to channel water away from edge

Excess trimmed off with snips

Excess trimmed off with snips

Finishing the Main Roof

I rolled out lengths of tar paper on the ground and cut them to the width of the main roof. It’s easier to do this here than try to manage a full roll up on the roof.

Rolling out tar paper and cutting lengths on the ground

Rolling out tar paper and cutting lengths on the ground

Rolling out and stapling tar paper to main roof strapping

Rolling out and stapling tar paper to main roof strapping

I line up the first piece along the bottom edge, with a bit of overhang, and staple in place.

Here’s where I have to be careful not to step in the gap between strapping boards and rip my tar paper.

Overlapping tar paper and stapling to strapping

Overlapping tar paper and stapling to strapping

Ripped the tar paper with staple hammer. Dang!

Ripped the tar paper with staple hammer. Dang!

I draw lines on a long 2×4 every 36 inches or so and use this as a marking guide for my panels. Then my screw holes are all in a line and hit the intended strapping board.

Using a marking board to set screw locations in roofing panel

Using a marking board to set screw locations in roofing panel

The first panel is the guide for all the rest. So I always double check my position and alignment with the edge and peak of the roof before running in screws with my impact driver.

Lining up and screwing tin roof panels

Lining up and screwing tin roof panels

I use the staple heads on the tar paper to guide my footing.

These panels went up pretty fast. The last one needed a narrow strip trimmed off to make it fit.

Ripping the last roofing panel to width

Ripping the last roofing panel to width

I had my roofing supplier bent up some rake and peak trim for me. I cut these to length and bent down a small tab on the lower edge before screwing into place.

Adding metal rake trim to gable ends of shed roof sections

Adding metal rake trim to gable ends of shed roof sections

On this edge I predrilled the holes with a small bit to make it easier to set the screw in the right place. This was an edge where I bent up the roofing panel.

Adding high eve trim to upside of front roof

Adding high eve trim to upside of front roof

And some peak trim goes on the upper edge of the front roof. This piece is more for aesthetics than function as there should be no rain hitting this edge of the roof.

Overlapping rake trim and screwing to rafter trim on main roof

Overlapping rake trim and screwing to rafter trim on main roof

The trim comes in 10 foot lengths so I have to piece sections together for coverage. On the main roof I start at the bottom with a small piece of rake trim. Then overlap a longer strip and screw it into place through the side.

Using tin snips and hand seaming tool to bend tabs on rake trim

Using tin snips and hand seaming tool to bend tabs on rake trim

To make the small tab I cut out two sections of the trim with tin snips then bend the remaining section over with a hand seaming tool.

043 Pavilion Part 3.17237

Final rake trim installed

One last side rake trim to do.

High eve metal roof trim added to leading edge of main roof

High eve metal roof trim added to leading edge of main roof

Now the peak trim goes on. I bend a small tab on this piece and it slips in under the side trim. Later I’ll add a small bead of caulking at this joint.

Eve trim overlaps the first

Second eve trim overlaps the first

Eve trim is attached with screws into roof panel ribs

Eve trim is attached with screws into roof panel ribs

The last piece overlaps and the tab slips in under the rake trim.

High eve trim sits flat across leading edge of roof panels

High eve trim sits flat across leading edge of roof panels

And that’s about it!

DIY Timber Frame Gazebo is complete!

DIY Timber Frame Gazebo is complete!

See the How to Video.

Back to Part 2