Building Projects

Build a Timber Frame Style Woodshed Part 3

By September 16, 2018 November 25th, 2018 No Comments

Build your own Timber Frame Woodshed for Firewood Storage and Drying. Plans available for download in PDF Format.

Part 3 of 3

back to Part 1  back to Part 2

See the How to Video.

We heat our house with wood and need a drying and storage shed as close to the wood stove as possible. There’s a perfect spot right beside the house here that has easy access through the front or back door. It’s also close to the driveway for loading with my truck.

Building the Post and Beam Style Woodshed – Part 3

Rafters

The rafters are now selected and the crown marked for their upside and orientation on the top beams. They are cut to length and the quarter ellipse drawn and cut on each end.

Select rafters and draw profile on ends

Select rafters and draw profile on ends

Cut ellipse profiles with jigsaw - Timber Frame Woodshed

Cut ellipse profiles with jigsaw

The rafters are 2×6 fir and the profiles are cut with the jigsaw in the same fashion as the beams, albeit with a shorter and thinner blade.

I stain all the rafters and let dry overnight.

One finished rafter is laid in place across the beams and the birds mouth marked.

Lay a rafter over the beams - Timber Frame Firewood Shed

Lay a rafter over the beams

A horizontal seat cut and a vertical plumb cut.

Mark a set cut and plumb cut

Mark a set cut and plumb cut

The birds mouth, when cut, allows the rafter to fully sit on the beam - Timber Frame Firewood Shed

The birds mouth, when cut, allows the rafter to fully sit on the beam

I use a block of wood that will mark the seat of the birds mouth equal to the width of the beam.

Cut the birdsmouth with a circular saw then finish with the jigsaw

Cut the birdsmouth with a circular saw then finish with the jigsaw

I take it down to the sawhorses and cut the birds mouth with a circular saw and finish with the jigsaw. It is test fitted then screwed into place.

End rafters are secured with a small galvanized angle bracket

End rafters are secured with a small galvanized angle bracket

The middle rafters are toe screwed and the end ones attach with a small galvanized angle bracket.

Rafter Support Blocks
Timber Frame Firewood Shed - Support blocks are tapped in with a hammer between the rafters

Support blocks are tapped in with a hammer between the rafters

Blocks are cut and installed between the rafters to add lateral support. One block between the front rafters, and another at the back. I also add these blocks to help straighten any rafters that may have a twist to them.

These blocks add lateral support to the rafters

These blocks add lateral support to the rafters

They also allow me to straighten rafters that have a twist to them - Firewood Shed

They also allow me to straighten rafters that have a twist to them

Alternatively, you can add these blocks at the time you are installing each rafter. That might be easier than trying to cut and fit each one after the rafters are in.

Roof Strapping
Strapping is screwed over the raftersv

Strapping is screwed over the rafters

Strapping made of 1×6 or 1×4’s are laid over the top of the rafters and screwed in place. They will be the support and attachment points for the metal roof screws later.

Walls
Pre-stained and cut 2x4's are screwed to the girts and cross members

Pre-stained and cut 2×4’s are screwed to the girts and cross members

While I’m waiting for the metal roof panel order to arrive, I can complete the carpentry by adding the walls. They are made of two by fours spaced across the cross members and girts. They are cut to length, stained, and screwed in place.

These 2x4's create a sturdy wall

These 2×4’s create a sturdy wall

I also pre-drilled each 2x4 while they were on the saw horses. This speeds up installation

I also pre-drilled each 2×4 while they were on the saw horses. This speeds up installation

I use stop blocks clamped to the top of the cross member to make placement and alignment easier. I use spacing blocks between the slats for a consistent gap. I used two by fours for strength and also because a had a lot of them.

Roof Felt
Tar paper rolled over the strapping and stapled in place

Tar paper rolled over the strapping and stapled in place

When the roofing arrived I rolled out tar paper over the strapping. Thee roll is three feet wide. I overlapped it and attached it with staples.

Roof panels are marked with a sharpie where screws will go.

Roof panels are marked with a sharpie where screws will go.

I made a marking stick from scrap trim to mark the location of the screws on the panel with a sharpie. This ensures each screw is properly spaced and hits the intended strap.

Install Metal Roof Panels
Sliding the first roof panel into place - Timber Frame Firewood Shed

Sliding the first panel into place

The first panel is positioned square to the roof and a few screws run in - Shed Roof

The first panel is positioned square to the roof and a few screws run in

I slide the first panel into place, line it up and square it to the roof as best possible. Then hold it in place with a few screws. When I’m happy with the placing of this first panel I run in more screws.

Careful to step only where a strap supports me - Roofing the Firewood Shed

Careful to step only where a strap supports me

From the other side of the shed I mark a panel and slid it up and onto the roof. Then slide it over and overlap the edge. Again, hold it in place with a few screws.

 Firewood Shed - Panels slid up and screws run in

Panels slid up and screws run in

Then climb up on the roof and screw each panel fully. Being careful to step only where there is strapping. This is repeated until all the panels are in place.

Rip the last roof panel to width with drill cutter attachment - Shed Build

Rip the last panel to width with drill cutter attachment

The last panel is measure and cut to size.

A thin strip is what's needed to finish the roof

A thin strip is what’s needed to finish the roof

I have a sheet metal cutting attachment for my drill that works very well. It’s fast, accurate, and leaves an edge that is not as sharp as with shears or snips.

Eve and gable end flashing with a drip edge is screwed into place

Eve and gable end flashing with a drip edge is screwed into place

After the last panel is in I add drip edge to the front high eave and the sides.

And the woodshed is done.

Splitting some dry fir rounds

Splitting some dry fir rounds

Finally filling our new Timber Frame Woodshed. Stocked for winter

Finally filling our new Timber Frame Woodshed. Ready for winter

Now to split some wood and fill the woodshed. I added some dividers to the inside space to separate stacks.

Thanks for reading!