Building Projects

Build a Timber Frame Style Woodshed Part 2

By September 15, 2018 February 26th, 2019 No Comments

Build your own Timber Frame Woodshed for Firewood Storage and Drying. Plans available for download in PDF Format.

Part 2 of 3

back to Part 1  ahead to Part 3

See the How to Video.

We heat our house with wood and need a drying and storage shed as close to the wood stove as possible. There’s a perfect spot right beside the house here that has easy access through the front or back door. It’s also close to the driveway for loading with my truck.

Building the Post and Beam Style Woodshed – Part 2

Make the Braces

I made the braces the day before using 2×8 full dimension red cedar.

Trace the pattern onto 2x8 red cedar stock

Trace the pattern onto 2×8 red cedar stock

I laid out and cut a plywood pattern according to the plans. I trace the pattern then cut opposing forty five degree angles on the miter saw.

cut alternating 45 degree angles on the brace

cut alternating 45 degree angles on the brace

This ensures the brace will be ninety degrees.

I cut the curved sections on the band saw.

66 Timber Frame Woodshed - Cut the brace curves on the bandsaw

Cut the brace curves on the bandsaw

I sand this cut smooth with a small hobby belt sander.

Timber Frame Firewood Shed - Sand the curved cuts smooth with a hobby belt sander

Sand the curved cuts smooth with a hobby belt sander

The flexible sanding belt follows the curve of the brace quite well. The braces will be attached to the shed posts and beams with a long lag bolt at a twenty degree angle to help pull the brace tightly into the corner.

Set up the drill press to drill angled holes in the braces - Timber Frame Woodshed Firewood Shed

Set up the drill press to drill angled holes in the braces

I tilt the table on my drill press to this angle, mark the hole center, and clamp some simple stops to the table to hold the pieces in place.

Countersink with forstner bit - Timber Frame Woodshed

Countersink with forstner bit

only about 1 inch deep to set the lag bolt head down

only about 1 inch deep to set the lag bolt head down

A countersink with a forstner bit drops the head of the bolt neatly below the surface. Then I switch bits to drill the pilot hole for the shank of the lag bolt.

Then drill through with bit

Then drill through with bit

Using my angle grinder with a sanding disc, I bevel the edges of each corner braces except the edge that mates with a post, girt, or beam. So all the outside edges.

Angle grinder with sanding disk to break sharp corners - Timber Frame Firewood Shed

Angle grinder with sanding disk to break sharp corners

Attach Braces

I mark the post and the beam one inch in from the outside edge to guide the brace location. I hold it securely in place and drill into the post and beam and drive in a lag bolt with an impact driver.

Hold brace in place, drill, then run in long lag bolt with impact driver - Post and Beam Woodshed

Hold brace in place, drill, then run in long lag bolt with impact driver

For this project, this simple brace is more than enough to give the structure rigidity. A brace with a proper tenon that is mortised into the post and the beam is always the best option, but for this small wood shed I think a flat mounted brace with a long, angled, lag bolt is enough.

Install more girts

On the other side of the shed I’ll attach the girts to the posts in the same fashion.

Set upper girt in place - MAN about TOOLS

Set upper girt in place

Secure with a long bar clamp, then drill and run in some lag bolts into post - Timber Frame Shed

Secure with a long bar clamp, then drill and run in some lag bolts into post

I countersink and secure the lower girts to the posts with lag bolts. And attach the corner braces.

Staining

At this point I’ll apply two coats of a semi-transparent stain with a small roller.

Apply a semi-transparent stain to the frame

Apply a semi-transparent stain to the frame

This green colour will match the paint on the house. It’s easier to stain the frame now than later when the roof and walls are on. I try to pre-stain as much as possible or when it’s convenient.

Top Beams
Cut the long beams and four sides with circular saw, then finish the cut with a hand saw - Firewood Shed

Cut the long beams and four sides with circular saw, then finish the cut with a hand saw

Now I’ll select the long front and rear beams and cut them to length. They are a bit too big for my miter saw stand so I’ll cut them with a circular saw. I mark all four sides with a square, make four cuts, then finish off the middle with a hand saw.

Trace the ellipse profile on the end of the beams - Firewood Shed

Trace the ellipse profile on the end of the beams

The beams have a quarter ellipse profile cut into the ends. I laid out this pattern on thin plywood and trace it onto both sides of the beams at each end.

Layout the 1" deep slot in the underside of the beams to sit down on the posts - Firewood Shed

Layout the 1″ deep slot in the underside of the beams to sit down on the posts

I measure the distance between the posts and transfer these dimensions to the beams. I want these beams to sit down on the posts by an inch. I’ll cut these wide grooves with my circular saw and clean them up with a chisel. I think this looks better than simply attaching the beams to the posts on the flat, and it prevents the posts from twisting and the structure from racking.

I bought a new jigsaw specifically to cut these end profiles on the beams.

7.0 Amp Bosch kick ass jigsaw - Timber Frame Firewood Shed

7.0 Amp Bosch kick ass jigsaw

Some research led me to the Bosch with it’s seven amp motor and it’s sturdy guide that helps prevent the blade from wandering. I also bought some long blades that will cut at least six inches deep.

Cut the profiles in the 6x6 inch beam with 9" blade on jigsaw - Timber Frame Shed

Cut the profiles in the 6×6 inch beam with 9″ blade on jigsaw

These blades are fairly wide so I wasn’t sure if I could cut the sharp elliptical radius. I decided to start from the end and work my way in and try to keep to the line as best I could.
The vibration moved the beam on the sawhorses so I had to stop and weigh them down.

Almost a perfect cut - certainly good enough for this outdoor structure - Timberframe Shed

Almost a perfect cut – certainly good enough for this outdoor structure

I was happy with the result and I only had a small degree of wander or pushoff.

Timber Frame Firewood Shed - Chamfer the beams with a power hand plane, then finish with angle grinder

Chamfer the beams with a power hand plane, then finish with angle grinder

As before, I’ll chamfer the edges with a power plane and angle grinder.

Drill beams for long lag bolts - Timber Frame Firewood Storage Shed

Drill beams for long lag bolts

The beams attach to the posts with a long lag bolt. I’ll countersink the head with a forstner bit, then drill a pilot hole straight and square with a drill guide, then finish with a bit slightly smaller than the bolt’s shank.

Now I’ll stain these beams and let dry.

Install Beams
Timber Frame Shed - Setting back beam in place with help from my wife, Marilyn

Setting back beam in place with help from my wife, Marilyn

To place the beams I enlisted the help of my wife Marilyn. It’s definitely a two person job. Red cedar is not a heavy wood, but too awkward to do this safely single handed. The rear beam fell into place easily.

102 Timber Frame Woodshed Firewood Shed - Setting the front beam in place

Setting the front beam in place

The front beam was tight so I tapped it in with a hammer.

Drill through beam and into post. Then run in long lag bolt - Timber Frame Woodshed

Drill through beam and into post. Then run in long lag bolt

I drilled into the posts with a long bit, then secured the beams with big lag bolts. I’ll attach the braces to the posts and beams. Now I can remove the temporary bracing.

4×4’s for Back Wall and Front Door
Back wall is supported with two 4x4's

Back wall is supported with two 4×4’s

The back wall of the shed has two vertical 4×4’s to add additional support to hold the weight of the stacked firewood. These are cut to length, screwed into the saddles, plumbed, then secured to the rear beam with screws. Across the back will be a pair of horizontal 2×6’s.

105 Timber Frame Woodshed - Front doorway 4x4's have grooves cut in to accept front cross members

Front doorway 4×4’s have grooves cut in to accept front cross members

The front doorway is made from 4×4’s and installed same as the back wall except that they will have slots cut in to accept the front cross members.

Cross Members
Stand up and secure doorway posts - Post and Beam Shed

Stand up and secure doorway posts

They are identical to the girts except only shorter.

Tap into place the doorway cross members

Tap into place the doorway cross members

I countersink and drill the ends then tap into place. Then drill into the posts and run in some lag bolts.

109 Timber Frame Woodshed Firewood Shed - Drill then run in some lag bolts. Hand tighten with socket wrench

Drill then run in some lag bolts. Hand tighten with socket wrench

I’ll hand tighten the last few turns with a socket wrench so I don’t strip the wood out or break a bolt.

Toe screw doorway header in place - Timber Frame

Toe screw doorway header in place

The doorway header is cut to length on the miter saw then the curve copied from a brace and cut on the band saw. It’s toe screwed into place.

See part 3

 

%d bloggers like this: