Simple Concrete Raised Garden Beds – Part 1

Cut END ASSEMBLY pieces

Then it’s a matter of taking what’s left from the 1×4 and cutting the parts for making up the end assembly. So there would be six parts altogether.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

Drill HOLES in SIDES and ENDS

Now we’re going to drill the holes for the dowels(pipes) in parts D and in the end walls so the first thing to do is lay those out with the measurements.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

We know that we’re coming down one inch and then on the D parts one and three-quarters in on the sidewalls. Also one and three quarters from the other end.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

This is going to be a half inch hole I’ve got a half inch bit in my drill.
And the little drill block that I have by Milescraft this is really handy. This is basically replacing a drill press for us.
It has holes going from 1/2″ down to 1/8″ which is perfect for us. And also it has these small alignment grooves that’ll help us position our drill block exactly where we need it to drill exactly in the center of that hole.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

So I don’t drill into my workbench, I’ve got a scrap piece of lumber for this. I just kind of sight down that and basically just hold it in place and go nice and easy.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

Drill assembly PILOT HOLES

Now I’m going to lay out the locations of the pilot holes to make up the end wall assembly as well as where they will attach to the base.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

So let’s start with Part D and I know that D I’m going to come in a 3/8 of an inch down the side and 3/4 of an inch from the top and the bottom.
I can set this ahead of time to my 3/8 mark and then I can use this a scrap piece here as a 3/4 inch marker for parts D here so I know I’m going to be coming down on D 3/4 of an inch and 3/4 of an inch up from the bottom and then D’s going to attach on this side 3/8 in.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

I have the spots marked for the pilot holes because D is going to go together with Part C and II like to make an end wall assembly like this so I’m going to need to drill pilot holes to go through this direction as well as pilot holes for screws that are coming in this direction here so it’s a matter of just laying out those holes.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

And with 1/8 bit just drill in the pilot holes. Now the drill block also has a 1/8 inch guide here but I think for this size a hole and what it’s doing here just free-handing these would be fine.
So that’s going to put the screw right in the center of the other piece.

Cutting the sides and ends of the form with simple tools

All right so that’s D and then with let’s say Part E when I look at that one I only have one that I need to worry about and it’s the screw that’s going to hold it through the bottom wall into a piece like this which would be the base and that one is 3/4 inch up from the bottom. And somewhere in the center the pilot hole for each.
Now I’ll do the pilot holes for the sidewalls and 3/8 in from the sides. Okay and we’ll do the same with the other side wall.

7 thoughts on “Simple Concrete Raised Garden Beds – Part 1”

  1. will the sharkbite 1/2 tubing work, or would it be too big for this? 3/8 is hard to find in less than 50 ft rolls around here.

  2. I’d like to try 2×8 and 52″ long form. Do you think that will be strong enough or other concerns for this dimension (7.25 x 52 x 2)?

    1. I think it will be strong enough at that length. However, it will be quite heavy and take a bit more effort to level, square, and pin into place in your garden. But doable I’d say.

  3. I love the idea of a long lasting garden bed. Any idea how these would hold up in the cold northern end of the province? I would be afraid they would crack apart in the freezing temperatures.

    Wishing you projects that square themselves.

    1. Thanks! In Part 2 of that series I tank a bit at the end about ways to help the panels survive a winter. And I also did a full series where I test the strength of them.

  4. Caught not reading through your wonderful detailed instructions! Next time we get out to town, I will be giving this a try. Again, thanks!

  5. Andre Raymond II

    With your concept I made 2”x7”@36” @ about 40lbs. Made a wood mold of bricks to match house and added color and grout. Using it for edging and raised beds. Made second set of brick faux stamps for double stacking. Project is still on going but a big Thank You shout out to you and your videos.

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